Decision Fatigue, does it interfere with creativity?

choicesIs it possible that decision fatigue influences people’s willingness to engage in creativity and innovation?  In what ways might decision fatigue impact the quality or quantity of new ideas generated/sought or new decisions made?  Read on…

from Do You Suffer From Decision Fatigue? – NYTimes.com.

“The more choices you make throughout the day, the harder each one becomes for your brain, and eventually it looks for shortcuts, usually in either of two very different ways.

  • One shortcut is to become reckless: to act impulsively instead of expending the energy to first think through the consequences. (Sure, tweet that photo! What could go wrong?)
  • The other shortcut is the ultimate energy saver: do nothing. Instead of agonizing over decisions, avoid any choice.

Ducking a decision often creates bigger problems in the long run, but for the moment, it eases the mental strain. You start to resist any change, any potentially risky move — like releasing a prisoner who might commit a crime. So the fatigued judge on a parole board takes the easy way out, and the prisoner keeps doing time.

Decision fatigue is the newest discovery involving a phenomenon called ego depletion, a term coined by the social psychologist Roy F. Baumeister in homage to a Freudian hypothesis. Freud speculated that the self, or ego, depended on mental activities involving the transfer of energy. He was vague about the details, though, and quite wrong about some of them (like his idea that artists “sublimate” sexual energy into their work, which would imply that adultery should be especially rare at artists’ colonies). Freud’s energy model of the self was generally ignored until the end of the century, when Baumeister began studying mental discipline in a series of experiments, first at Case Western and then at Florida State University. ”

see Do You Suffer From Decision Fatigue? – NYTimes.com.